Interview Aam Gaysi: I Am What I Am And Proud Of It

I am from a small town called Kamshet (Lonavala), where being open about your sexual orientation is considered a sin and people never accept it.

Interviewee: Sanket Sveronic

Q. What do you identify as (gay, bi, transgendered, queer, non-binary)?

I identify as gay and proud to be a queen.

Q. When did you first start to define your identity as such?

I think around the time I accepted the same, approximately three years ago.

Q. Have you experienced first-hand trans/homophobia? If yes, how did you deal with it?

I am from a small town called Kamshet (Lonavala), where being open about your sexual orientation is considered a sin and people never accept it. So I was scared when I came out as they wanted me to leave everything or they would not maintain any relations with me. And I was like, ‘Bitches, please excuse’.

Q. When did you first out yourself? Who did you come out to and why did you come out to that person?

I was 18 when I realized that I was always attracted to men instead of women. I came out to my best friend, then my so-called girlfriend in college. She hugged me tightly and started crying and said she was proud of me. She has been my ‘chaddi-buddy’ from class 7. After this, I came out to my mom and sister.

Q. Have you come out to any family member? Did your coming out change anything about your relationship with them?

I am open to the whole world but my family doesn’t want to accept it, as they think it will spoil their name. After coming out to family, it felt like troubles and emotional drama had arrived at my doors. My family tried to explain to me how it was a just a phase. Meanwhile, our extended family started taunting my parents. I decided to leave my house. I can still only talk to my mother, sister and brother-in-law. Things are now better, but not that well with my family.

Q. Do you think being gaysi makes it harder to come out, and that if you weren’t part of such a traditional and conservative culture, you would have an easier time with your sexuality/identity?

I don’t think so. I am what I am and proud of it, and being gaysi gives me more strength to persevere in the world I have around me.

Q. Okay, a few fun things now! What are your turn-ons? And turn-offs?

They are many turn-ons, like deep penetrating, eye contact, kissing my neck and stomach, and whispering in my ears. And most importantly, open mindedness.

And oh my god, turn-offs are like nightmare hair, smelling like shit, bad body odour, anyone who is hairy.

Q. Your favourite pick-up or pick-me up line?

“If you and I were the last men on earth, I bet we could do it in public.”

Or, “nice ass… what time does it open?”

Q. Share a moment from your life that makes you the most happy about being gaysi.

The way people look at you and respect you when you’re working for community rights.

Q. One Indian celebrity you would love to see coming out as gaysi?

Of course, Sidhartha Malhotra.

Q. Your favourite queer-themed movie?

Brokeback Mountain

Q. Your favourite queer-themed book?

Oh Joy, Sex Toy

Q. Your all-time favourite quote?

“Of all the creatures of earth, only human beings can change their patterns. Man alone is the architect of his destiny. Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.”

Be you, be blunt.

About the author


Now 30, 100% shudh desi lesbian. Likes living large, and on the edge. Dislikes stagnation, fence sitting and hypocrites. Lives in a bubble of joy, with occasional lapses into drama queendom. Currently nursing a massive crush on actress Chitrangada Singh (kind of eerie, her resemblance to the late Smita Patil, don’t you think?). Aspires to build a fully functional support system for the Gaysi community in India. And most importantly, top the 'Hottest eligible desi-lezzie' list one bright sunny day.
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