Archive for the category Reviews

Reviews of Queer films, books, events and everything else under the colorful rainbow

280 posts

Film Don Jon Has Good Messages To Give Us, Yet Puts A Moral Responsibility On Women To “Fix” Men

Jon is addicted to porn, he shows all the signs of an addict. He spends hours browsing pornography websites, is unsatisfied with real life sex, cannot have stable relationships, mastrubates an unhealthy amount any time of the day and night (probably why I didn’t realise his job as a bartender for most of the movie), feels guilty about it because he confesses to the priest at church but continues doing it anyway.

On Celebrating Queerness – The Song We Sang

‘The Song We Sang’ is not a grand or iconic cinematic depiction of Queerness, but it surely is the most beautiful 21-minutes of winessing two, independent, young, Queer women cross each other’s path, eventually growing fonder by the passing night.

Love, Sex, MeToo, And The Supreme Court

In its introduction, Kirpal writes that the law is woven intricately with all of our lives in ways we don’t seem to fully imagine. He also affirms that “the Constitution has become a document embodying all that is aspirational in the Indian imagination,” transferring much-needed hope and confidence to its interpretation by the judicial system in contemporary times.

Disenchantment Season 3: Never Been Mor(a) mazing

The writers of Disenchantment have been hinting at Bean being queer since the second season, but it is in the episode titled ‘The Last Splash’ that we get to see her experience a genuine connection with another character. So far, Bean’s life has been about casual encounters and last-minute hook-ups, but this episode gives her an actual romantic arc without making it sappy or pretending that ‘this was what was missing all along’.

An Unpretentious, Nonconformist Short-Story Collection, ‘Principles Of Predictions’ Establishes The Entry Of An Authentic Voice

A voice in my head said: It’s a review; tell what you’ve read. Ask them to buy this book if you liked it, or ask them to stay away from it. The other one said, inspired by Joan Didion: If you’re not sure about this paragraph, place it in the middle; no one will notice it. Who knows what people do and do not notice, anyway?

The Handmaiden, An Explosion Soused In Eroticism

What is surprising is that male sexuality in the film is represented as frozen and obscene in contrast to the eroticism and intimacy of the two women. It's because the director shows sexuality as a tool of domination. The male gaze is shown as an unwelcome voyeurism and lacks an understanding of women.