Archive for the category Reviews

Reviews of Queer films, books, events and everything else under the colorful rainbow

273 posts

Disenchantment Season 3: Never Been Mor(a) mazing

The writers of Disenchantment have been hinting at Bean being queer since the second season, but it is in the episode titled ‘The Last Splash’ that we get to see her experience a genuine connection with another character. So far, Bean’s life has been about casual encounters and last-minute hook-ups, but this episode gives her an actual romantic arc without making it sappy or pretending that ‘this was what was missing all along’.

An Unpretentious, Nonconformist Short-Story Collection, ‘Principles Of Predictions’ Establishes The Entry Of An Authentic Voice

A voice in my head said: It’s a review; tell what you’ve read. Ask them to buy this book if you liked it, or ask them to stay away from it. The other one said, inspired by Joan Didion: If you’re not sure about this paragraph, place it in the middle; no one will notice it. Who knows what people do and do not notice, anyway?

The Handmaiden, An Explosion Soused In Eroticism

What is surprising is that male sexuality in the film is represented as frozen and obscene in contrast to the eroticism and intimacy of the two women. It's because the director shows sexuality as a tool of domination. The male gaze is shown as an unwelcome voyeurism and lacks an understanding of women.

Wonder Woman 1984: It Is Good, But It Can Be Better

Superhero movies have traditionally catered to a male audience with an emphasis on superbly choreographed action sequences with much flare and destruction. ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ turns that on its head. In one of the first action sequences of the movie, we get an “I hate guns” from Diana, as she gracefully and comically stops a robbery at the mall.

A Rather Critical Review: Secret Cities In “Chippa”

The film unfolds over the city in the darkness of night, which, as we know, is where we can see stray shapes and shadows in the corners. It may be the end of a workday, or it may be that those whom Chippa meets belong to the dregs of an indifferent society, people who are so invisible that they cannot help but allow Chippa such free rein.