Archive for the tag Culture

Review: “Disclosure” By Sam Feder And Amy Scholder

The title of the documentary is evoked at one point by writer and actress Jen Richards, “I kind of hate the idea of disclosure, in the sense that it presupposes there is something to disclose.” I’m still trying to wrap my head around this and many other things said in the documentary. Having struggled with coming out and the idea of stealth, having often thought, “at what point do I need to tell them I’m trans?”, her statement brings up many feelings and emotions for me, as I attempt to process the idea of a world where my transness is absolutely nobody else’s business.

I Lost Out

I instantly had an impulse to pull her close to me and kiss her on her the curve of her neck. I fought that urge and decided to walk out and light the cigarette for her instead, she always had trouble with matchsticks. She breathed in the smoke, made a cloud that enveloped her face, I noticed my mouth was open in a rather odd fashion and immediately stiffened as she passed me the cigarette.

Somewhere Over The Rainbow

I grew up with an all-consuming love for Bollywood movies. They supplied the canvas for my visions and the soundtrack to my life’s cadences. To go to the theatre to watch a movie was to touch magic. And nowhere was that magic more apparent than in the quintessential Bollywood romance.

Marriage: The Bane Of Existence For Sexual And Gender Minorities In India

Why is marriage a prerequisite for women (cis or AFAB folx) to be finally envisaged as respectable members of society? In communal terms, much like Austen promised, it is a universally acknowledged belief that a young woman must be in want of a handsome eligible young man. This older-than-dinosaurs theory has been a prevalent legacy passed on as a privilege from the pagan gods.

Why Ruskin Bond’s ‘Delhi is Not Far’ Is A Breath of Fresh Air

Based in the sixties, in the small town of Pipalnagar where nothing ever happens, the story is told from the point of view of Arun, an aspiring writer, who aims to one day live in Delhi. While the town of Pipalnagar is almost a character of the story in itself, Arun is only living there because he doesn’t have anywhere else to go.

Are You A Geneticist, Mr Swamy?

Subramanian Swamy’s homophobic tweet is making rounds. No one knows how he thought to share a piece of filth from the past. It’s posted two years ago, when Section 377 was read down. No one seems to learn from their mistakes, certainly not Mr Swamy.

A Letter To Gheorghe

The way you were there with Johnny, sometimes loudly, sometimes silently was a lesson to me. The way you taught Johnny to be responsible towards his family was like seeing an imprisoned bud confined by emotionless rituals getting bloomed in an impeccable sunny morning.

The Untold Story

Too nervous to make a conversation, I continued on my way to class, Asking my friends about you, When I got to know you were new.

The Stress Is Real

Michael Hobbes in his popular HuffPost article titled The Epidemic of Gay Loneliness writes “gay men everywhere, at every age, have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, incontinence, erectile dysfunction,? allergies and asthma — you name it, we got it.” Which he further into the article attributes to “minority stress.” Minority stress as the name suggests, is the chronically high levels of stress faced by members of stigmatised minority groups.

The Process Of Unlearning

Even before I learned how vast the LGBTQI+ spectrum was, I don’t think I was biased against someone because of their identity. However, due to the lack of conversation on the topic, I’m sure I’ve had my fair share of insensitive moments. I’m sure a lot of us have.

The Mystery Of Asexuals And Aromantics

Asexuality is the lack of sexual attraction and aromantisim is the lack of romantic attraction. Both are a spectrum and hence also act as umbrella terms for demisexual, graysexual and demiromantic, grayromantic respectively.

I Am Antara And This Is My Story

I was 14 years old the first time I came out. I was scared and dreading the fact that my then partner’s parents were going to ‘out’ me to my father. I came home prepared to end my life and wrote a letter to my father explaining how I had kissed a girl and her parents had made me feel fear for feeling what I felt!

Call Me By My Name

To make my coming out easier, I told everyone I discovered I was gay in a moment of epiphany in my final year of college. I had had a real girlfriend until my second year. The story I put out was that we broke up because of relationship problems.