Archive for the tag Films

Let’s Talk About Sex (On Screen)

The first time I saw two women have sex in a movie was in Blue is the Warmest Colour (2013) – I was a curious teenager and I specifically went looking for the now infamous six-minute scene after I found out about it in my very trustworthy Delhi Times, which framed it as “the talk of the town” at Cannes.

Girls’ Shorts At Kashish 2020

Five out of six filmmakers were women. The odd one out, and first in the line up was 6:23 am by Geoffrey Breton (please note that the ‘Boys Shorts’ film category didn’t have a single female director, which is: not surprising).

What We Mean When We Critique

A critique of something doesn’t imply that the thing in question is complete garbage (although it sometimes is), but that there are things the piece does wrong that it could do better, which it won’t do better unless one points it out and holds it to a higher standard.

Poem: Lesbian Movies

predictably building up to a steamy lovemaking scene, marked by the male gaze and then there's the inseparability

To Be A Child In A Prejudiced World

The magic realism of ‘My brother is a Mermaid’ and the monochrome colouring of ‘Mall’ show us what it is like to be a child in a prejudiced world- filled with gender roles and teachings that are not tailored to our individual identities.

Film Bonde Is Different, It’s Not Sad.

Lua, Rai and Camis prepare for a night out in Sao Paulo. The preparation for a group night out is written with exquisite accuracy. Right from the day-long hype in the group chat, to picking out and explaining your choice of booze before the party, and finally getting there only to risk it all when that one song starts to play.

(Not) Just Another Love Story…But A Story Worth Telling!

Nagarkirtan is a story about two characters, Puti, a trans-woman stuck in a man’s body living in a ghetto for hijras in Kolkata with her Gurumaa and her chosen family, and Madhu, a cis-gender man who is a flutist with a kirtan group and a part-time delivery boy from the rural heartlands of Bengal.

The Deep Disappointment That Is Bulbbul

Plenty has been said about the references the film makes, its cinematography and production design and it's wonderful actors, and I’m not disputing any of these things. My contention remains with the content of the film and the claims it, or others, have made that it might be “feminist” or cover several “gender issues”.

Power And Parenting In She-Ra And The Princesses Of Power

As an adult who has often desired a different childhood, shows such She Ra and the Princesses of Power feels both, like tackling a messy landscape with no answers as well as dipping a toe into a kinder, better past. It does not shy away from complex characters, violence and its implications, and really does so without the moralism or innocence of commonplace children’s shows (better known as family TV). While at the same time, the art and the storytelling impart a sense of ease, assuring us of the possibility of a resolution.

Review: “Disclosure” By Sam Feder And Amy Scholder

The title of the documentary is evoked at one point by writer and actress Jen Richards, “I kind of hate the idea of disclosure, in the sense that it presupposes there is something to disclose.” I’m still trying to wrap my head around this and many other things said in the documentary. Having struggled with coming out and the idea of stealth, having often thought, “at what point do I need to tell them I’m trans?”, her statement brings up many feelings and emotions for me, as I attempt to process the idea of a world where my transness is absolutely nobody else’s business.

Somewhere Over The Rainbow

I grew up with an all-consuming love for Bollywood movies. They supplied the canvas for my visions and the soundtrack to my life’s cadences. To go to the theatre to watch a movie was to touch magic. And nowhere was that magic more apparent than in the quintessential Bollywood romance.

A Letter To Gheorghe

The way you were there with Johnny, sometimes loudly, sometimes silently was a lesson to me. The way you taught Johnny to be responsible towards his family was like seeing an imprisoned bud confined by emotionless rituals getting bloomed in an impeccable sunny morning.
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