Archive for the tag Gender

Reimagining Queer Indian Lives Post-377

Recognition from law is one thing but acceptance of society is another. The community is still struggling for jobs and accommodation. Like when I moved to Mumbai recently, I faced lots of difficulty finding a transgender-friendly accommodation. Imagine if this is happening to someone who has a high profile corporate job and think about the less fortunate people.

Reviving A Disabled World

While speaking with Gaysi, Nu and Sam from Revival shared that the magazine was formulated about a year ago, with the intention of raising awareness about issues regarding disability, sexuality, and intersectional ableism. But now, it has evolved into a home to more than a hundred disabled and queer individuals.

On The Importance Of Queer Elders

Coming out as a lesbian in India, be it to yourself or to others, signifies the loss of a certain heteronormative script which governs the lives of most people. This script prescribes a certain timeline by which most lives are ruled, especially in India – marriage, children, in-laws, old age. To be queer in India is to realise that this script will never be your life. But even more significant than the loss of this script is the realisation that there are many things in life that you may never have – a lifelong companion, family, love or happiness. At least, this is what I believed.

In Conversation With Natalie Truong Of Gay Games

Sports bring people and communities together and create social cohesion. It’s no different in Gay Games. The only difference is, GGHK is designed to show the world that LGBTQ people are out, proud, and eager to participate and compete! Not only in sports, but every walk of life.

Bollywood’s Gay Men: Predators Or Best Friends?

These creative choices are often lauded for their awareness, while their harmful aspects get overlooked. The stereotypes and humorous acts are seen as acts of categorisation and stifling of individuality. These associations enable the identification of the community and their reduction to heteronormative binaries of feminity and masculinity.

P.S. I Love My Body

Children in the school teased me and called me different names like Bauna (Lilliput), Maiki (Womanly), etc. There were lots of confusing changes in my body; each thing seemed different than before and distinct from each other. I was just sure of one thing: that I was a male and related to others of my sex, mentally as well as sexually.

Pink Flamingo, A Photo Series To Create Awareness On Pomosexuality

Sometimes these labels of sexuality caused me more stress and trauma. It led me to the idea of defining all my partnerships and prove time and again my position within the LGBTQIA+ community. My sexuality has been validated with my choices and redefining it with a label was something which was upsetting and deteriorating to my well-being and I believed that it's more than just a mere definition.

Here’s Why We Can’t Get Enough Of Lil Nas X’s New Music

As a queer girl in India, not knowing if I can come out to someone has often made me feel unsure and trapped. Holding back a part of my identity that feels so important to me has left me feeling ashamed, like I'm hiding a dirty secret. To me, it is this feeling that the music video of Industry Baby captures, along with the eventual euphoria that comes with being true to oneself.

Why Your Calvins Are Gay

If one doesn’t think life is a war and fashion your armor in the 21st century, some serious soul-searching needs to be done on their part. Used to oppress, fashion does hold the key to opening spaces for those who are cast out for not conforming to the norm (which is not “normal” per se, just more common!), just ask the likes of Calvin Klein, Gianni Versace and Giorgio Armani who monetized it.

Yoga And Queerness

Thin people often become the face of fitness and this extends to the brand of yoga. It is also seen as an activity to become thin, to gain that 'hot summer bod', rather than as a mindful practice. However, in the spirit of subversion of dominant heteronormative ideas of movement, we spoke to Allé K (he/they), a queer, fat, trans masc activist and educator who is also a certified yoga instructor.

Here’s Why There’s No Such Thing As A Coming Out Story

I've always had a problem with the phrase, to be honest. I had never understood the need to disclose my sexuality to someone. I was a naive child. I was uncomfortable around heterosexuals. I didn't see their story or read about them; I was very annoyed that there are so many of their kind.

My Stretch Marks Tell My Story

Through all of the ups and downs of my acceptance journey, my body has picked up some battle scars, or ‘physical accolades’ if you will, in the guise of stretch marks. These stretch marks used to torment me as glaring signs of my flaws but now I view them as markers of my journey, as imperfections that make me who I am. My stretch marks tell my story.

The Surprise Of Group Therapy

Walking into my first group session felt nerve wracking and started to bring anxiety; however, since I was not required to speak or share about myself, there was much less pressure and I could be in the background. Unlike graduate school, where you can’t really get by without talking to anyone, I went on for days without speaking to anyone during my group therapy sessions. I didn’t know what to say or the right thing to say, I didn’t know if there was a point even in sharing what I was going through to a group of strangers.

Haseen Dillruba: India’s Nice-Guy Fantasy

The film is populated with our everyday misogynists without any meaningful criticism levied at any of them: the casually verbally-abusive and tharki neighborhood boys, the misogynist-stud Neel who takes non-consensual photographs and publicly broadcasts intimate liaisons, the friend-of-the-husband who thinks women ought to be trained and our very own protagonist nice-guy who’s the quintessential incel with his ranting about ordinary nice boys going unnoticed and his barely concealed scary, violent rage.

Who’s Allowed To Kiss Anyway?

The moment when Xtina, Brintey Spears and Madonna kissed on stage at the 2003 VMAs has been immortalized and widely-reviewed as provocative. For most of us who are not cis-men, it is evident that this kiss was largely fetishized, playing into the fantasy of the male gaze that enjoys watching women kiss for the viewer's pleasure.