Naz Celebrations, New Delhi

If there is one constitutional tenet that can be said to be underlying theme of the Indian Constitution, it is that of ‘inclusiveness’. The inclusiveness that Indian society traditionally displayed, literally in every aspect of life, is manifest in recognising a role in society for everyone. Those perceived by the majority as “deviants’ or ‘different’ are not on that score excluded or ostracised.

Naaz Celebrations at Jantar Mantar, New Delhi (for more pictures, check out Gaysi flickr stream)

The notion of equality in the Indian Constitution flows from the ‘Objective Resolution’ moved by Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru. Nehru, in his speech, moving this resolution wished that the House should consider the Resolution not in a spirit of narrow legal wording, but rather look at the spirit behind that Resolution. He said, “Words are magic things often enough, but even the magic of words sometimes cannot convey the magic of the human spirit and of a Nation’s passion… (The Resolution) seeks very
feebly to tell the world of what we have thought or dreamt of so long, and what we now hope to achieve in the near future.

If there is one constitutional tenet that can be said to be underlying theme of the Indian Constitution, it is that of ‘inclusiveness’. The inclusiveness that Indian society traditionally displayed, literally in every aspect of life, is manifest in recognising a role in society for everyone.  Those perceived by the majority as “deviants’ or ‘different’ are not on that score excluded or ostracised.

Where society can display inclusiveness and understanding, such persons can be assured of a life of dignity and non-discrimination. In our view, Indian Constitutional law does not permit the statutory criminal law to be held captive by the popular misconceptions of who the LGBTs are.  It cannot be forgotten that discrimination is anti-thesis of equality and that it is the recognition of equality which will foster the dignity of every individual.

was read from the judgment when opening the celebration of the judgment by the Delhi High Court in favour of decriminalizing homosexuality in India.

Dance performance on Govinda's jhatkas

The colorful people were cheering in high spirits and were extremely enthusiastic. it was indeed a celebration of sexuality, individuality, fearlessness & freedom!

The event was celebrated in its own unique way. There were moving speeches, songs, music on guitar, and poetry recitation by the community people.

A metaphorically symbolic dance performance on Govinda’s song “ kisi disco mein jaein, kisi hotel mein khaein , … koi dekh le na humein yahan …” was the highlight of the evening! There was an inspiring and powerful self-expression of harmony and freedom by a transgender that deeply touched me. The presence of the members of QueerCampus was a sign that queer movement in India is growing.

The evening brought together the community once again. The voices were loud and clear and it was just one of those magical moments from ‘Were the world mine’ where everyone around you was like you. The annoying media was out there in force trying to capture all faces from all angles. People did express its complaint with the media for not being fair and responsible in telling our stories and perpetuating myths but were still warm to them.

The event was concluded on the song ‘Banwara mann dekhne chala ek sapna’ and a candle light vigil in the memory of Prof Siras and countless other citizens who paid a heavy price for being queer.

Note: A big thanks to the Delhi Queer Pride Committee for organizing this event.

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Chicklet

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